Bucao Field Photo

Bucao

Bucao Watershed is considered as the largest Watershed in Zambales and one of the most important watersheds in the municipality of Botolan, Zambales as it is the source of water for Bucao River supporting the major irrigation system of the municipality. The watershed also serves as the source of economic opportunities for the communities as most of the families are dependent on the watershed resources for their livelihood.

Bucao river at Botolan, Zambales, Philippines during the reconnaissance of the LiDAR1 Projet team on the study site on December 3, 2014. Bucao river also known as Bucan river is one of the eight (8) rivers identified as project sites. The research team selected and identified the rivers that causes flood based on the flood susceptibility map of MGB. ( Photo by Nicasio Salvador)

 It is located in the provinces of Zambales and Tarlac and covers a total land area of more or less 68,145.77 Ha. , 7,681.34 Ha. lies in San Jose and Capas Tarlac and about 60,464.43 Ha. lies in Botolan, Cabangan, San Marcelino, Iba and San Felipe, Zambales wherein 55,401.58 Ha. is within the town of Botolan. There are 2 barangays included in the Province of Tarlac namely Maamot and Sta. Juliana.Whereas 28 barangays comprises the Province of Zambales distributed into the five towns namely: Sta Fe in San Marcelino, Balincaguing in San Felipe, Cadmang-Reserva in Cabangan, and Sta Barbara in Iba while the 23 remaining barangays are found in the town of Botolan namely as follows, from the east are the Barangays of Moraza, Villar, Palis, Nacolcol, Burgos, Maguisguis, Cabatuan, Belbel, Poonbato, Owaog-Nibloc & Malomboy. Wheras Western barangays included San Juan, Taugtog, Mambog, Batonlapoc, Paudpod, Carael, Porac, Paco, Tampo, San Miguel, Beneg and Bangan.[/edsanimate]

Bucao

The picture was taken at Bucao Bridge in Bucao River, Botolan, Zambales, Philippines during the gathering of bathymetric data by the UP LiDAR1Team (Photo by Eleazar Raneses on Dec. 3, 2014).

 Slope of Bucao watershed is flat to moderately rolling to relatively steep. Elevation ranges from 16 meters to 1,740 meters above sea level. The slope of 0-8 percent which is about 3.80 percent of the area falls within the coastal barangays of municipality of Botolan.

The slope of 8-18 which is 1.6 percent of the area covers mostly the central part of the watershed. The slope of 18-30 which represents about 0.85 percent is distributed to all parts of the watershed.  The 30-50 slope categories covers roughly 2.3 % of the entire watershed located along foot slopes of the watershed’s mountain ridges. While the remaining areas falls within the 50 and above slope category with 91.45 %.

DSC_5522

Bucao River taken under the Bucao bridge, Botolan, Zambales, Philippines by Eleazar Raneses on December 3, 2014.

The Bucao Watershed has a total area of 68,145.77 Ha. or 681,457,700 m² with an approximate basin length of 41,261.57 m. and has an average width of 20,631.31 m. The perimeter has an approximate length of 226,268 m. covering all the tributaries downstream to Bucao River. The river is drained downstream from the foot slopes of Zambales mountain range converging down to the central portion of the watershed.

The watershed is divided into five (5) sub-watersheds: Pinatubo, Balintawak, Bucao II, Bucao I and Baquilan sub watershed. Pinatubo Sub-watershed has the largest area covering 23,202.31 hectares followed by Balintawak Sub-watershed with an area of 15,052.76 Ha.  Bucao II Sub watershed has an area of 13,855.92 Ha. Bucao I Sub-watershed covers 9,903.40 Ha. Baquilan sub watershed has the smallest area covering only 6,131.38 Ha. (Source, DENR 2011)

Remote Sensing Activities

Bucao North Coast

A-B

Bucao South Coast

C-D

Photos were taken during the field validation at the north (Photos A & B) and south coast (Photos C & D) of Bucao River in Zambales on July 2015 by the LiDAR 1 researchers. Field validation in remote sensing study was undertaken to monitor coastline change in Bucao River. Coordinates of every sampling point were measured using the Global Navigation Satellite System (Rover). In Photos are Engr. Eleazar Reneses Jr. , Engr. Bennedict Pueyo and Engr. Jose Gavino. Photos by: Engr. Nicasio A. Salvador

 ~Marietta A. Pakaigue

 

Bucao River Outlet

The Bucao River Outlet.  Field validation or actual validation of data of the Bucao river outlet was undertaken on July 2015. LiDAR 1 researchers measured the distance of the Bucao river outlet to monitor geophysical changes (Photo A). This activity is part of the Remote Sensing study of the Bucao River. Lahar (from Mount Pinatubo eruption in 1991) was also noticed at the back of the LiDAR researchers causing the erosion and accretion of the area (Photo B). In photos are Engr. Bennedict Pueyo (right) and Engr. Jose Gavino (left). Photos by : Engr. Nicasio A. Salvador ~Marietta A. Pakaigue
 

The Bucao River Outlet.  Field validation or actual validation of data of the Bucao river outlet was undertaken on July 2015. LiDAR 1 researchers measured the distance of the Bucao river outlet to monitor geophysical changes (Photo A). This activity is part of the Remote Sensing study of the Bucao River. Lahar (from Mount Pinatubo eruption in 1991) was also noticed at the back of the LiDAR researchers causing the erosion and accretion of the area (Photo B). In photos are Engr. Bennedict Pueyo (right) and Engr. Jose Gavino (left). Photos by : Engr. Nicasio A. Salvador

 ~Marietta A. Pakaigue

Riverbank_A-B

Riverbank_C

Photos show the different sampling sites of the Bucao Riverbank. Pictures were taken during the field validation on the Remote Sensing study. LiDAR 1 researchers measured the distance of the river bank starting from the mouth of the river to upstream.   In the photos are Engr. Bennidict Pueyo (right) and Engr. Jose Gavino (left). Photos by : Engr. Nicasio A. Salvador

~Marietta A. Pakaigue